​Men are more than twice as likely as women to develop oral cancer, according to new figures released by Cancer Research UK.

The latest data shows around 5,300 men are diagnosed with oral cancer every year in the UK compared to around 2,500 women.

The data also reveals oral cancer is more often diagnosed in men at a younger age compared with other cancers.

Oral cancer is the 11th most common male cancer overall, but among men aged 45-59 it is the fourth most common.

Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth, tongue, lips, tonsils and the middle part of the throat (oropharynx).

Around nine out of 10 oral cancer cases in the UK are linked to preventable causes like smoking, alcohol and contracting human papillomavirus (HPV).

The difference between cases in men and women may be due to men indulging more heavily in some of these activities. For example, there are higher smoking rates in men and an estimated 75% of male oral and pharyngeal cancers in the UK are linked to tobacco smoking.

Cases of oral cancer have been going up in both men and women over the last decade, with rates rising from 10 cases per 100,000 people a year in the mid-2000s, to 13 cases per 100,000 today.

To help tackle the rise in oral cancer, Cancer Research UK offers a free online educational resource for dentists and GPs to help them to spot the disease earlier, supported by the British Dental Association.

The Oral Cancer Recognition Toolkit includes information on what to look out for, how to refer patients for further tests and how to prevent the disease.

It has already been accessed by over 25,000 dentists and GPs across the UK.

For more, go to https://www.doctors.net.uk/eclientopen/cruk/oral_c...